f0led

here is another project built around the esp8266. it's a wireless osc controlled 100w led. as the led should act as a stroboscope and not be kept on for long durations of time, i could save space and cost using a smaller sized heatsink. via wifi (opensound control) the led can be turned on/off, the level, attack and release times adjusted etc. there is also a push button trigger input as well as a microphone input (both not connected in the picture). so the strobe can be triggered manually by the musician, by the sound of the nearby instrument or remotely by a computer.

the strobe also send out osc data from the button and mic so it can in turn be used to trigger additional sounds in the computer.

supercollider example code...

OSCFunc.trace(true)
OSCFunc.trace(false)

n= NetAddr("192.168.1.104", 15555);
n.sendMsg(\led, 0.5, 0.1)   //val, fade
n.sendMsg(\led, 0.0, 0.01)  //val, fade
n.sendMsg(\micMode, 1);  //mic on/off
n.sendMsg(\micFade, 1.0, 0.1);  //mic atk rel
n.sendMsg(\butFade, 1.0, 0.1);  //but atk rel

OSCdef(\oscin, {|msg| msg.postln}, \f0led, NetAddr("192.168.1.104", 15555));

f0led 1

the battery is a 12v sealed lead-acid and i measured up toward 8 amps current draw. it weights about 0.5kg.

f0led schematics

bill of material...

1       ESP8266-01
1       4x2 socket
1       heatsink
2       100uF cap
1       100 resistor
1       10k resistor
1       10k log pot     (reichelt ACP 6-L 10K)
1       regulator       (reichelt LF 33 CV)
1       mosfet          (reichelt IRLZ 34N)
1       mic             (reichelt MCE 101)
4       screwterminals  (reichelt AKL 101-02)
1       12v lead-acid   (pollin 94‑271194)
1       heatsink        (ebay 2.4x2.4inch Aluminum Alloy Heat Sink for 1W/3W/5W/10W LED Silver White)
1       dcdc            (ebay DC DC boost converter Constant Current Mobile Power supply 250W)
1       100w led        (ebay 100W Cool White High Power LED LIGHT SMD chip Panel 9000-10000LM)

thick wires
heat paste
screws and nuts

arduino code...

// * install OSC from https://github.com/CNMAT/OSC
// * edit where it says EDIT below
// * choose board: "Generic ESP8266 Module" 160 MHz

//TODO: gamma correction

#include <ESP8266WiFi.h>
#include <WiFiUdp.h>
#include <OSCMessage.h>
#include <OSCData.h>

//pin3 (urxd) can do pwm out
//pin2 and pin0 can not do pwm
//pin2 and pin0 have to be 3v3 at powerup

#define PINMIC 0
#define PINBUT 2
#define PINPWM 3
#define PORT 15555
#define UPDATERATE 16
#define PINGRATE 600

const char *ssid = "f0led"; //EDIT your accessPoint network name
const char *password = "mypass";  //EDIT your password
const IPAddress outIp(192, 168, 1, 105);  //EDIT receiver ip (supercollider)
const unsigned int outPort = 57120;
float micFadeAtk = 1.0, micFadeRel = 0.1; //default fade times
float butFadeAtk = 1.0, butFadeRel = 0.1; //default fade times
float val = 0.0, valTarget = 0.0, fade = 1.0;
unsigned long nextTime;
byte micMode = 0;  //allow mic trigger led on/off
byte micState = 1;
byte butState = 1;
int cnt;
WiFiUDP Udp;
OSCMessage msgPing("/f0led");
OSCMessage msgMic("/f0led");

void setup() {
  delay(10);
  WiFi.begin(ssid, password);
  while (WiFi.status() != WL_CONNECTED) {
    delay(100);
  }
  Udp.begin(PORT);
  Serial.begin(115200, SERIAL_8N1, SERIAL_TX_ONLY);
  pinMode(PINMIC, INPUT);
  pinMode(PINBUT, INPUT_PULLUP);
  pinMode(PINPWM, OUTPUT);
  msgMic.add("mic");
  msgPing.add("ping");
}

void oscLed(OSCMessage &msg) {
  valTarget = msg.getFloat(0);
  fade = msg.getFloat(1);
}
void oscMicMode(OSCMessage &msg) {
  micMode = msg.getInt(0);
}
void oscMicFade(OSCMessage &msg) {
  micFadeAtk = msg.getFloat(0);
  micFadeRel = msg.getFloat(1);
}
void oscButFade(OSCMessage &msg) {
  butFadeAtk = msg.getFloat(0);
  butFadeRel = msg.getFloat(1);
}
void sendOscBut(byte val) {
  OSCMessage msg("/f0led");
  msg.add("but");
  msg.add(val);
  Udp.beginPacket(outIp, outPort);
  msg.send(Udp);
  Udp.endPacket();
  msg.empty();
}
void sendOscMic() {
  Udp.beginPacket(outIp, outPort);
  msgMic.send(Udp);
  Udp.endPacket();
}
void sendOscPing() {
  Udp.beginPacket(outIp, outPort);
  msgPing.send(Udp);
  Udp.endPacket();
}

void loop() {

  //--osc input
  OSCMessage oscMsg;
  int packetSize = Udp.parsePacket();
  if (packetSize) {
    while (packetSize--) {
      oscMsg.fill(Udp.read());
    }
    if (!oscMsg.hasError()) {
      oscMsg.dispatch("/led", oscLed);
      oscMsg.dispatch("/micMode", oscMicMode);
      oscMsg.dispatch("/micFade", oscMicFade);
      oscMsg.dispatch("/butFade", oscButFade);
    }
  }

  //--mic input
  if (digitalRead(PINMIC) == 0) {
    if (micState == 0) {
      micState = 1;
    }
  }

  if (millis() >= nextTime) {
    nextTime = millis() + UPDATERATE;
    if (cnt % PINGRATE == 0) {
      sendOscPing();
    }
    cnt++;

    //--mic input2
    if (micState == 1) {
      micState = 2;
      sendOscMic();
      if (micMode == 1) {
        valTarget = 1.0;
        fade = micFadeAtk;
      }
    } else if (micState == 2) {
      if (digitalRead(PINMIC) == 1) {
        valTarget = 0.0;
        fade = micFadeRel;
        micState = 0;
      }
    }

    //--button input
    if (digitalRead(PINBUT) == 0) {
      if (butState == 0) {
        butState = 1;
        sendOscBut(1);
        valTarget = 1.0;
        fade = butFadeAtk;
      }
    } else {
      if (butState == 1) {
        butState = 0;
        sendOscBut(0);
        valTarget = 0.0;
        fade = butFadeRel;
      }
    }

    //--fade in/out
    if (val < valTarget) {
      val = val + fade;
      if (val > valTarget) {
        val = valTarget;
      }
    } else if (val > valTarget) {
      val = val - fade;
      if (val < valTarget) {
        val = valTarget;
      }
    }

    analogWrite(PINPWM, int(val * 1023));
  }
}

f0neo

here is how i build super cheap wireless osc controlled rgb ledstrips. the main components for these are an esp8266, a 5v powerbank, a voltage regulator and some leds. the leds i've used so far are the SK6812 RGBW, but it is easy to adapt the arduino code to work with other models like the WS2812B.

f0neo 1

f0neo 2

f0neo schematics

a basic version of the arduino code shown here below. when it starts it creates a soft access point. connect to it with a computer or phone, figure out the ip address of the esp8266 and start sending osc commands to it.

// * install OSC from https://github.com/CNMAT/OSC
// * install Adafruit_NeoPixel from library manager
// * edit where it says EDIT below
// * choose board: "Generic ESP8266 Module"
// * upload and connect to softap with laptop
// * try to send osc messages to ip 192.168.4.1 port 19999
//protocol: [\rgbw, index, red, green, blue, white] example red: [\rgbw, 0, 255, 0, 0, 0]

#include <ESP8266WiFi.h>
#include <WiFiUdp.h>
#include <OSCMessage.h>
#include <OSCData.h>
#include <Adafruit_NeoPixel.h>

#define PORT 19999
#define NUMNEO 12  //EDIT number of neo pixels in use
#define PINNEO 2

const char *ssid = "f0neo"; //EDIT softAccessPoint network name
const char *password = "mypass";  //EDIT password

WiFiUDP Udp;

//EDIT to match type of leds (see example/Adafruit_NeoPixel/strandtest)
Adafruit_NeoPixel pixels = Adafruit_NeoPixel(NUMNEO, PINNEO, NEO_RGBW + NEO_KHZ800);

void setup() {
  pixels.begin();
  pixels.show();
  WiFi.softAP(ssid, password);
  Udp.begin(PORT);
}

void rgbw(OSCMessage &msg) {
  pixels.setPixelColor(msg.getInt(0), msg.getInt(2), msg.getInt(1), msg.getInt(3), msg.getInt(4));
  pixels.show();
}

void loop() {
  OSCMessage oscMsg;
  int packetSize = Udp.parsePacket();
  if (packetSize) {
    while (packetSize--) {
      oscMsg.fill(Udp.read());
    }
    if (!oscMsg.hasError()) {
      oscMsg.dispatch("/rgbw", rgbw);
    }
  }
}

attached (zip file) are more elaborate versions of this code - also including maxmsp and supercollider examples and kicad schematics.

AttachmentSize
Package icon f0neo.zip26.95 KB

f0dmx

here is how i built a wireless isolated dmx controller that takes osc input. the box uses an esp8266 to create a wifi access point that one can connect to with a laptop (or phone or whatever). opensound control messages sent to the box are converted into standard dmx commands. multiple clients can be connected and send dmx commands at the same time.

f0dmx 1

f0dmx 2

below is arduino code for the esp8266, the kicad schematics and some supercollider test code.

//Generic ESP8266 Module, 160 MHz

#include <ESP8266WiFi.h>
#include <WiFiUdp.h>
#include <OSCMessage.h>
#include <OSCData.h>
#include <LXESP8266UARTDMX.h>

#define PORT 19999  //EDIT osc port
const char *ssid = "f0dmx"; //EDIT softAccessPoint network name
const char *password = "mypass";  //EDIT password

WiFiUDP Udp;

void setup() {
  WiFi.softAP(ssid, password);
  Udp.begin(PORT);
  //pinMode(BUILTIN_LED, OUTPUT);
  ESP8266DMX.startOutput();
}

void dmx(OSCMessage &msg) {
  int channel = msg.getInt(0);
  int value = msg.getInt(1);
  ESP8266DMX.setSlot(channel, value);
}

void start(OSCMessage &msg) {
  ESP8266DMX.startOutput();
}

void stop(OSCMessage &msg) {
  ESP8266DMX.stop();
}

void loop() {
  OSCMessage oscMsg;
  int packetSize = Udp.parsePacket();
  if (packetSize) {
    while (packetSize--) {
      oscMsg.fill(Udp.read());
    }
    if (!oscMsg.hasError()) {
      oscMsg.dispatch("/dmx", dmx);
      oscMsg.dispatch("/start", start);
      oscMsg.dispatch("/stop", stop);
    }
  }
}

bill of material...

1       dcdc            ROE-0505S       reichelt
1       xlr female      XLR 3KU         reichelt
1       optocoupler     6N 137          reichelt
1       ic              SN 75176BP      reichelt
1       box             BOPLA KS 420    reichelt
1       resistor        10K
1       resistor        470
3       resistor        10
1       resistor        120
2       cap             10uF
1       cap             100uF
1       regulator       LF 33 CV
1       micro           ESP8266-01
1       socket          4x2
1       usb cable

f0dmx kicad schematics

example of how to send osc from supercollider to the f0dmx box. make sure you send integers and not floats.

//make sure you are connected to the f0dmx wifi network
n= NetAddr("192.168.4.1", 19999);  //the ip and port of the f0dmx box
n.sendMsg(\dmx, 9, 255)  //dmx channel 9, value 255
n.sendMsg(\dmx, 9, 0)
n.sendMsg(\dmx, 7, 100)  //dmx channel 7, value 100
n.sendMsg(\dmx, 7, 0)

n.sendMsg(\stop)  //usually not needed
n.sendMsg(\start)

AttachmentSize
Package icon kicad schematics27.48 KB

optoforce

here's some python code for reading serial input from optoforce's 3d sensor and sending it over osc to maxmsp or supercollider.

the slightly odd baudrate of 1000000 isn't supported in sc nor max under osx, so i had to use python for this.

#for the 3d sensor OMD-30-SE-100N
#f.olofsson 2017

#first argument is serial port, second ip and third port.  e.g.
#python optoforceOsc.py '/dev/tty.usbmodem1451' '127.0.0.1' 9999

import sys
from struct import *
from threading import Thread
import serial
from OSC import OSCServer, OSCClient, OSCMessage, OSCClientError

osc= OSCClient()
if len(sys.argv)>3:
  osc.connect((sys.argv[2], int(sys.argv[3])))  #send to address and port
else:
        osc.connect(('127.0.0.1', 57120))  #default send to sc on same computer

serport= '/dev/cu.usbmodem1411'
if len(sys.argv)>1:
  serport= sys.argv[1]

ser= serial.Serial(
  port= serport,
  baudrate= 1000000,
  parity= serial.PARITY_NONE,
  stopbits= serial.STOPBITS_ONE,
  bytesize= serial.EIGHTBITS,
  timeout= 1
)
print('connected to serial port: '+ser.portstr)

def oscInput(addr, tags, stuff, source):
  print stuff  #for now do nothing

server= OSCServer(('0.0.0.0', 9998))  #receive from everywhere
server.addDefaultHandlers()
server.addMsgHandler('/optoforceConfig', oscInput)
server_thread= Thread(target= server.serve_forever)
server_thread.start()

print('sending osc to: '+str(osc.address()))
print('listening for osc on port: '+str(server.address()[1]))

###configure sensor (optional)
conf= bytearray(9)
speed= 10  #0, 1, 3, 10, 33, 100 (default 10)
filter= 3   #0 - 6 (default 4)
zero= 255   #0, 255
checksum= 170+0+50+3+speed+filter+zero
conf[0]= 170
conf[1]= 0
conf[2]= 50
conf[3]= 3
conf[4]= speed
conf[5]= filter
conf[6]= zero
conf[7]= checksum>>8
conf[8]= checksum&255
ser.write(conf)

def main():
  while True:
    b= ser.read(4)
    header= unpack('BBBB', b)
    if header==(170, 7, 8, 10): #data
      b= ser.read(12)
      counter= unpack('>H', b[0:2])[0]
      status= unpack('>H', b[2:4])[0]
      xyz= unpack('>hhh', b[4:10])
      checksum= unpack('>H', b[10:12])[0]
      sum= (170+7+8+10)
      for i in range(10):
        sum= sum+ord(b[i])
      if checksum==sum:
        #print(counter, status, xyz)
        msg= OSCMessage()
        msg.setAddress('/optoforce')
        msg.append(xyz)
        try:
          osc.send(msg)
        except OSCClientError:
          print 'osc: could not send to address'
      else:
        print 'data: checksum error'
        print checksum
    else:
      if header==(170, 0, 80, 1): #status
        b= ser.read(3)
        status= unpack('B', b[0])[0]
        checksum= unpack('>H', b[1:3])[0]
        if checksum!=(170+0+80+1+status):
          print 'status: checksum error'
          print checksum
      else:
        print 'header: serial read error'
        print header

if __name__ == '__main__':
  try:
    main()
  except KeyboardInterrupt:
    server.close()
    server_thread.join()
    ser.close()

optoforce 3d sensor with maxmsp from redFrik on Vimeo.

optoforce 3d sensor with supercollider from redFrik on Vimeo.

supercollider firmata 3

reading digital inputs from an arduino with the scfirmata is a little bit more complicated than needed.

here an example that reads 6 analog and 6 digital at the same time.

NOTE: use resistors (10K) to pull up or pull down the digital inputs. (i couldn't figure out how to activate the built in pullups.)

SerialPort.devices;
d= SerialPort.devices[0]; // or d= "/dev/tty.usbserial-A1001NeZ" - edit number (or string) to match your arduino
f= FirmataDevice(d);//if it works it should post 'Protocol version: 2.5' after a few seconds

(
~analog= [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5];  //A0-A5
~digital= [2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 12];  //some digital input pins
s.latency= 0.05;
s.waitForBoot{
        var freqsArr= 0!~analog.size;
        var ampsArr= 0!~digital.size;
        Ndef(\snd3, {Splay.ar(SinOsc.ar(\freqs.kr(freqsArr, 0.05), 0, \amps.kr(ampsArr.lag(0.01))).tanh)}).play;
        ~analog.do{|x|
                f.reportAnalogPin(x, true);      //start reading analog pins
        };
        f.analogPinAction= {|num, val|
                //[num, val].postln;
                freqsArr.put(~analog.indexOf(num), val);
                Ndef(\snd3).setn(\freqs, freqsArr);
        };
        ~digital.do{|x|
                f.setPinMode(x, \INPUT);
        };
        f.reportDigitalPort(0, true);
        f.reportDigitalPort(1, true);
        f.digitalPortAction= {|port, mask|
                var dig;
                //[port, mask, mask.asBinaryString].postln;
                dig= ~digital.collect{|x| ((mask<<(port*8))&(1<<x)==(1<<x)).binaryValue};
                Ndef(\snd3).set(\amps, dig.postln);
        };
};
)

(
Ndef(\snd3).stop;
~analog.do{|i|
        f.reportAnalogPin(i, false);     //stop reading A0-Anum
};
f.reportDigitalPort(0, false);
f.reportDigitalPort(1, false);
f.end;
f.close;
)

previous articles...

http://www.fredrikolofsson.com/f0blog/?q=node/647

http://www.fredrikolofsson.com/f0blog/?q=node/629

supercollider firmata 2

+2 years ago i put up a simple example of how to use firmata with arduino and supercollider here. that code still work but it only show how to read a single analog input on the arduino.

here is how one can read both A0 and A1 and map those to synth parameters in supercollider...

//how to read pins A0 and A1 with SCFirmata...
//tested with Arduino1.8.0 and SC3.8.0
//first in Arduino IDE:
//  * select File / Examples / Firmata / StandardFirmata
//  * upload this example to an arduino
//then in SC install the SCFirmata classes
//  * download zip file https://github.com/blacksound/SCFirmata
//  * extract files and put them in your sc application support directory
//  * recompile sc

SerialPort.devices;
d= SerialPort.devices[0]; // or d= "/dev/tty.usbserial-A1001NeZ" - edit number (or string) to match your arduino
f= FirmataDevice(d);//if it works it should post 'Protocol version: 2.5' after a few seconds

s.boot

(
Ndef(\snd, {|freq1= 400, freq2= 500, amp= 0.5| SinOsc.ar([freq1, freq2].lag(0.08), 0, amp.lag(0.08)).tanh}).play;
f.reportAnalogPin(0, true);      //start reading A0
f.reportAnalogPin(1, true);      //start reading A1
f.analogPinAction= {|num, val|
        [num, val].postln;
        switch(num,
                0, {
                        Ndef(\snd).set(\freq1, val.linexp(0, 1023, 400, 800)); //A0 mapped to freq1
                },
                1, {
                        Ndef(\snd).set(\freq2, val.linexp(0, 1023, 400, 800)); //A1 mapped to freq2
                }
        );
};
)

(
Ndef(\snd).stop;
f.reportAnalogPin(0, false);     //stop reading A0
f.reportAnalogPin(1, false);     //stop reading A1
f.end;
f.close;
)

and to read all six analog inputs (A0-A5) one can do...

SerialPort.devices;
d= SerialPort.devices[0]; // or d= "/dev/tty.usbserial-A1001NeZ" - edit number (or string) to match your arduino
f= FirmataDevice(d);//if it works it should post 'Protocol version: 2.5' after a few seconds

s.boot
~numberOfAna= 6;  //number of analog inputs (here A0-A5)

(
var freqsArr= 0!~numberOfAna;
Ndef(\snd2, {|amp= 0.5| Splay.ar(SinOsc.ar(\freqs.kr(freqsArr, 0.05), 0, amp.lag(0.08)).tanh)}).play;
~numberOfAna.do{|i|
        f.reportAnalogPin(i, true);      //start reading A0-Anum
};
f.analogPinAction= {|num, val|
        [num, val].postln;
        freqsArr.put(num, val);
        Ndef(\snd2).setn(\freqs, freqsArr);
};
)

(
Ndef(\snd2).stop;
~numberOfAna.do{|i|
        f.reportAnalogPin(i, false);     //stop reading A0-Anum
};
f.end;
f.close;
)

wireless mqtt circuits

i've stared using mqtt for talking to microcontrollers over wifi and here's some code and instructions on how to set up such a system.

there are two programs that have to run in the background. they handle all the communication between the wireless hardware and the client software (maxmsp, supercollider etc). one is mosquitto. mosquitto is a mqtt broker and the central pub/sub hub of the system. the second program is a python mqtt-osc bridge script using the paho client. this python script lets programs like maxmsp or supercollider talk to mosquitto via osc. see the readme.txt included below on how to install and configure these programs.

on the hardware side i build send/receive circuit nodes consisting of a esp8266 module and an arduino pro-mini. these circuits run on 3v, are small and configurable and the parts cost almost nothing. the esp8266 module provides wifi communication and runs a mqtt client (i'm using the adafruit mqtt library), while the pro-mini does the physical inputs and outputs (sensors, leds etc). the two modules talk to each other via serial.
some circuits i've build do 12 digital + 8 analog inputs, while others have 12 leds in combination with 8 analog inputs. but any combination is possible and the number of ins/outs depends on how the pro-mini is programmed. (see portable_promini_ana and portable_promini_led in the zip archive below.)

portable00

portable01

so far i'm really pleased with this new technique. it seems to scale well and work more reliable than what i used before (sending raw osc via cc3000 or esp8266).

AttachmentSize
Package icon portable.zip16.11 KB

syntjuntan

i got to design and build version 2 of syntjuntan's sewable synthesizer circuit. for this version they wanted to add an on-board amplifier that could drive a passive speaker element.

the circuit now has three schmitt triggers and can run on 3-12V. the amplifier is the classic lm386 and the connector pads around the board are made to fit needle and conductive thread as well as being crocodile friendly.

there are some options as standard through-hole soldering pads (a fourth schmitt trigger and x10 extra gain). the circuit can also be used as a standalone audio amplifier - just ignore the schmitt triggers and connect your own signal to the in pad.

anyway, lots of fun mass producing this and in the process i learned how to do hot-air smd soldering with stencil and solder paste plus got to know kicad a bit better.

i also built a test rig with an arduino and some pogo pins. it both scans for short-cuts and tests the sound.

syntjuntakrets 2 2

syntjuntakrets 2 4

syntjuntakrets 2 5

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